*Parenting a Child with ADHD

By Whitney Eaton, LCSW, and Ashley Miller – Tuesday, Jan. 9th –

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can be a struggle for parents and children.  ADHD is characterized by impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity.

Although children with ADHD can be just as smart and resilient as any other child, their brain makes them more prone to impulsive behavior and a lack of focus.

Raising a child with ADHD can involve obstacles other parents may not have to face.  Even though parenting a child with this challenge may be frustrating at times, it is not impossible.  It does require a different approach and a bit more patience, however.  Here are a few tips to help.

First, it is important to not become overwhelmed and take out your frustrations on your child.  The key is to remember your child has a medical condition and to acknowledge this fact.

Just as we wouldn’t blame a child that had a nut allergy for having an allergic reaction to nuts, we cannot blame a child with ADHD for some of the behaviors or inattention that result from that condition.

I once had a child describe ADHD to me from their perspective.  They said that it was like being on a carousel and not being able to stop the ride.  Things would go in and out of their attention span whether they wanted them to or not.  Because of this, we need to be patient and model gentle and calm behavior.

Children definitely mimic behaviors they see. Therefore, if your demeanor is calm your child may learn to be calm too.

Furthermore, praise your child for having good behavior so they will know when they are doing well and feel rewarded.

Second, create structure for your child so they can have success in school and at home.  This is done by creating a daily routine for your child and sticking to it.  Examples include having a set time to begin homework, eat dinner, get ready for bed, go to sleep, etc.

A regular bedtime that allows for eight hours of sleep is important for all children but especially for those who have ADHD.  Lack of sleep will worsen their hyperactivity and focus.

In addition, think about setting a specific time for your child’s tasks or chores.  This makes it is easier for both the parent and child instead making a list of chores and expecting the child to complete them on their own.

Third, have your child do a form of exercise.  This can involve your child joining a sports team, playing at a park with friends, or just walking/running in the neighborhood. Exercise will burn excess energy, improve concentration, decrease depression and anxiety, and stimulate the brain.

The fourth tip is to consider treatment for your child. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends “…for elementary school–aged children (6–11 years of age), the primary care clinician should prescribe US Food and Drug Administration–approved medications for ADHD and/or evidence-based parent and/or teacher-administered behavior therapy as treatment for ADHD, although preferably both medication and behavior therapy should be used together.”

Medication can help get ADHD symptoms such as impulsivity, lack of attention, and hyperactivity under control.  Counseling can help with developing organizational and social skills, dealing with stress, and increasing self-esteem.  Talk with your doctor about these treatments to determine the best one for your child.

Practicing these tips may make managing ADHD a little easier and allow your child to be more successful at school and home.  When a child feels as though he or she is doing well, they are more likely to try to please adults and strive for positive behavior.